Charlie Mattingly - Owensboro Health

Charlie Mattingly: A national search, led him right back here.

“When I first became aware that I had a problem with my prostate I was having my annual physical. My physician scheduled a biopsy, he did nine samples and it came back that six of the nine had cancer in them. 

He suggested that we needed to do something. But before we did that, I want to do some more research. 

"I had previously been to Knoxville, Tennessee. After that I talked to an oncologist in Flint, Michigan, I talked to people by phone in Dallas and one in Denver. I talked with two more in Flint and asked if there was anything else that I could do."

I had previously been to Knoxville, Tennessee. After that I talked to an oncologist in Flint, Michigan, I talked to people by phone in Dallas and one in Denver. I talked with two more in Flint and asked if there was anything else that I could do. 

"After that, my (urologist’s) recommendation was to go back to Owensboro, Kentucky and go to the Mitchell Memorial Cancer Center and see Dr. Ryan Faught, a radiation oncologist."

They said you can do a DNA study, that's about the end of it. And the blood work there said that I could expect to die within five years of I didn't do anything. 

After that, my (urologist’s) recommendation was to go back to Owensboro, Kentucky and go to the Mitchell Memorial Cancer Center and see Dr. Ryan Faught, a radiation oncologist. 

My urologist said you will like him, and Dr. Faught can give you equivalent results from radiation as what I can provide you with the robotic, radical prostatectomy. 

I had radiation on the Varian® true beam x-ray system, which is a state-of-the-art technique for radiation cancer treatments. I had no burning – no sensation – you would never know that I had been through radiation treatments. 

As to my final PSA, I started at 3.7, that went to a 4.0, that blew the whistle. I started researching. Two years later, I was up to an 8.9. I have now been through hormone therapy and 44 radiation treatments at Owensboro Health and I now have a PSA of a 0.006.  

It's almost non-detectable. 

Charles Mattingly, 74

Prostate Cancer Survivor

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